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Can you look at the lunar eclipse

Lunar eclipses are some of the most easy-to-watch astronomical events. All you need to see them are clear skies and a pair of eyes. Anyone on the night-side of the Earth at the time of the eclipse can see it. Viewing a lunar eclipse, whether it is a partial , penumbral or total eclipse of the Moon, requires little effort. All you need is a clear view of the Moon and the Sky, clothes to keep your warm at night, and a chair so that you can be comfortable while watching the eclipse. While you don't need any special equipment for viewing a lunar eclipse, astronomers and veteran photographers recommend some things that can make your lunar eclipse viewing experience even better.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Total Solar Eclipse (2017)

Lunar eclipse

The first thing to remember about observing an eclipse is safety. A solar eclipse is potentially dangerous, however, because viewing a solar eclipse involves looking at the Sun, which can damage your eyesight. A solar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse , when the Sun itself is completely obscured by the Moon.

Partial eclipses , annular eclipses , and the partial phases of total solar eclipses are never safe to watch without taking special precautions. Failure to use appropriate filtration may result in permanent eye damage or blindness. Looking at the Sun through any kind of optical aid binoculars, a telescope, or even a camera's viewfinder is extremely dangerous, and can cause permanent blindness.

There is no pain or discomfort when the retina is being burned, and the resulting visual symptoms do not occur until at least several hours after the injury has occurred; by which time it is far too late.

Professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait makes this case well Special report: Let your kids see the eclipse! An article by professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait, making the case that children can and should be allowed to safely view a solar eclipse.

However, safety must come first; so if you are not confident that you, or people you are responsible for, can correctly follow the safety precautions outlined here, then it would be best to stay indoors and watch the event on TV or the internet. To look at the Sun directly, you must use proper solar viewing protection, such as eclipse glasses. Sunglasses do not provide anything like adequate protection, as they do not block the wavelengths of light which are likely to damage your eyes, or reduce the intensity of the visible light sufficiently.

Since much of the damage is done by invisible infra-red light, the fact that the Sun appears dark in a filter or that you feel no discomfort does not guarantee that your eyes are safe. In fact, sunglasses can make it worse: as they block visible light, the pupil in your eye widens, letting in more harmful UV and infra-red light. Properly designed solar filters, made and certified to appropriate national safety standards, are therefore the recommended protection for direct viewing.

The relevant standard is ISO , so look for that mark. Genuine eclipse glasses made before may have been made to an older standard; they are probably fine, but still I would recommend trashing them and getting a new pair. They cost pennies, after all. These glasses should be much darker than regular sunglasses; they need to filter out ultra-violet, infra-red, and They should be reasonably new, and in good condition.

If in doubt, or if they appear to be damaged at all, destroy them. Various other ad-hoc solar filters are sometimes discussed; but in practice these can be dangerous, and so can't be recommended. Even if they seem to dim the Sun to a low level, they may be letting through invisible infra-red radiation which could be permanently harming your eyes. In any case purpose-designed eclipse viewing glasses are readily and cheaply available, so it's simplest and safest to get the real thing.

Fake goods of all kinds are becoming increasingly common; unfortunately, this can apply to solar viewing glasses too. It's terribly easy to make a pair of glasses with sub-standard tinted plastic, and print the relevant certification marks on them. So be sure that you obtain whatever viewing aids you use from a reputable source.

Viewing the Sun indirectly, by projecting its image onto a screen, is a safe way to enjoy any solar eclipse. You can make a projector with a simple pinhole, or with binoculars or a telescope, as described in Observing Eclipses. Note that a screen refers to a matte surface, such as a white sheet, or a piece of paper, so that the Sun's image can be seen by anyone looking at it from any angle. Looking at a reflection of the Sun in any shiny surface is basically the same as looking directly at the Sun, and as dangerous.

The naked eye view of totality is safe and is the most awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon you are likely to see. Just remember to look away and put your eclipse glasses back on before the Sun returns.

This is not true: looking at the Sun at any time for more than a second or two can cause permanent eye damage. Finally, I've heard some truly daft ideas for eclipse viewing, such as looking through a sheet of Perspex, or in a reflection in a bucket of water. I have no idea where these come from, but these are not safe! If you can see the Sun clearly and brightly, whether directly, in a reflection, or via Perspex, then it's dangerous.

This page therefore contains some information on eye safety during a solar eclipse. Copyright C Ian Cameron Smith. Last modified: UTC.

The What: Eye Safety

A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth moves between the Sun and Moon but the they don't form a straight line in space. A small part of the Moon's surface is covered by the darkest, central part of the Earth's shadow, called the umbra. The rest of the Moon is covered by the outer part of the Earth's shadow called the penumbra.

This illustration shows the Moon passing through Earth's shadow during a typical lunar eclipse. The Moon is slightly tinted when it passes through the light outer portion of the shadow, the penumbra, but turns dark red as it passes through the central portion of the shadow, called the umbra.

No part of this eclipse will be visible from North America. Visibility will be confined to central and east Africa, Eastern Europe, western and central Asia, most of Indonesia and Australia. Because at this moment in time the Moon is situated at a distance of , miles from Earth, its disk will appear slightly smaller than the Sun; four-tenths of one percent smaller to be exact. As such, when the Moon passes squarely in front of the Sun, it will not totally cover it, but instead, a narrow ring of sunlight will remain visible.

Tag: lunar eclipse

The first thing to remember about observing an eclipse is safety. A solar eclipse is potentially dangerous, however, because viewing a solar eclipse involves looking at the Sun, which can damage your eyesight. A solar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse , when the Sun itself is completely obscured by the Moon. Partial eclipses , annular eclipses , and the partial phases of total solar eclipses are never safe to watch without taking special precautions. Failure to use appropriate filtration may result in permanent eye damage or blindness. Looking at the Sun through any kind of optical aid binoculars, a telescope, or even a camera's viewfinder is extremely dangerous, and can cause permanent blindness. There is no pain or discomfort when the retina is being burned, and the resulting visual symptoms do not occur until at least several hours after the injury has occurred; by which time it is far too late. Professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait makes this case well Special report: Let your kids see the eclipse! An article by professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait, making the case that children can and should be allowed to safely view a solar eclipse. However, safety must come first; so if you are not confident that you, or people you are responsible for, can correctly follow the safety precautions outlined here, then it would be best to stay indoors and watch the event on TV or the internet.

Lunar eclipse guide: When and where to see in the UK

A partial lunar eclipse could be visible from the UK on Tuesday 16 July. An eclipse of the Moon occurs when the Earth lies directly between the Sun and the Moon and the Moon lies in the shadow of the Earth. For a total lunar eclipse to happen, all three are in a straight line. This means that the Moon passes through the darkest part of the Earth's shadow.

Four lunar eclipses will appear across Earth's skies in They will all be penumbral eclipses, which means the face of the moon will appear to turn a darker silver color for a few hours.

Find out what a lunar eclipse is and when the next total lunar eclipse in the UK will occur, as well as expert tips on how to see it from astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. An eclipse of the Moon occurs when the Earth lies directly between the Sun and the Moon and the Moon lies in the shadow of the Earth. For a total lunar eclipse to happen, all three bodies lie in a straight line. During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon usually turns a deep, dark red because it is illuminated by light that has passed through the Earth's atmosphere and has been bent back towards the Moon by refraction.

Watching Lunar Eclipses

When Earth casts its shadow on the Moon it can cause quite a spectacle. Find out how often these events occur, and where you can view them from over the next ten years. You might be familiar with the idea of a solar eclipse: when the Moon passes in front of the Sun from our point of view on Earth, blocking it out and turning day to night for a few minutes on the surface of our planet.

The third of will happen March As a result, there are two distance extremes of each orbit: closest approach, known as perigee, and the farthest, or apogee. When the Moon is at closest approach and within a day or so of being full, it is called a supermoon because the Moon will be at its brightest and largest. For the supermoon on Feb. A supermoon also occurred in January with a slightly more distant perigee, a mere miles kilometers farther away, but 14 hours after the full Moon.

Lunar eclipse guide: What they are, when to see them and where

But the eclipse will not peak until after 7pm GMT, when the lunar orb is closest to the centre of the shadow. Staring directly at a solar eclipse without certified filter glasses can be incredibly damaging to your eyes. Even when the Sun is shrouded by the Moon and the skies are deceptively dark, radiation from the Sun can still hit your eyes. Lunar eclipses, on the other hand, are completely safe to look at because the Moon does not glow with its own light. The light you see coming from the Moon is indirect light from the Sun, reflected back at us on Earth. So if you chose to see the ellipse outdoors today, be assured it is perfectly safe to look at the Full Moon directly and without protection. But if you decide to stay indoors today, you can watch the eclipse unfold from the comfort of your home.

Jan 30, - The total lunar eclipse is completely safe to look at with the naked eye. There is absolutely no need to worry about eye safety for this eclipse — it's.

Solar and lunar eclipses are spectacular sights. The shadow of Earth sweeping across the Moon, illuminating its grey surface in a blood red is breathtaking. But nothing quite compares to watching the Moon slowly eclipse the Sun until the its black disk is set against the ghostly white corona. You can also check our news section for information on upcoming visible eclipses , including the total solar eclipse visible across North America in

What is a partial lunar eclipse and is it safe to look at directly?

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. A lunar eclipse can occur only on the night of a full moon. The type and length of a lunar eclipse depend on the Moon's proximity to either node of its orbit. During a total lunar eclipse, Earth completely blocks direct sunlight from reaching the Moon.

Can You Look at a Lunar Eclipse? How to Safely Watch on January 31

You could be forgiven for thinking that America is suddenly experiencing lots of eclipses, but what will happen in the early hours of January 31 will be nothing like August's total solar eclipse in the U. While that event lasted just a few minutes and had to be viewed mostly through special safety glasses, the total lunar eclipse happening on Wednesday will last for hours, and be completely safe to watch. A supermoon is when our satellite is slightly closer to Earth than usual in its orbit, which results in a slightly larger and brighter moon — about 14 percent larger. Since the moon is so small in the night sky, that size difference will be difficult to appreciate.

Ну и что ты скажешь, моя красавица.

Она смутилась. - Боже, вы, кажется, сумели прочесть. Он посмотрел еще внимательнее. Да, он сумел прочитать эти слова, и их смысл был предельно ясен.

Проваливай и умри. Он повернулся к Росио и заговорил с ней по-испански: - Похоже, я злоупотребил вашим гостеприимством. - Не обращайте на него внимания, - засмеялась.  - Он просто расстроен. Но он получит то, что ему причитается.

Совершенно верно. Танкадо размахивает морковкой. - Вы видели этот алгоритм.

Comments: 2
  1. Tojazshura

    So happens. Let's discuss this question. Here or in PM.

  2. Digar

    Rather useful idea

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